The first weeks of Spring

We’ve had a little rain lately, not much but anything is good. The vegetables and fruit trees seem satisfied though. My favas and peas are reaching for the sky so much I’m worried their teepees will topple over. So far I’ve been lucky having learned my lesson the hard way in previous years.

Favas going crazy.
Favas going crazy.

 

How many peas will I miss picking with this planting idea? Think I’ll go back to my planting rows next time.

Peas in late March
Peas in late March

 

I’ve been strictly following my planting plans this year. Last year I tried to go digital with my planning but there’s something about just drawing it out in pencil that is SO much easier than trying to navigate those buggy online plant programs.

Planting plans
Planting plans

 

I’m doing a better job staggering my plantings too. I find in the past I’ve been impatient and couldn’t wait two to three weeks to sow another batch of seeds. And then everything ripens at once and I’m stuck with a glut of food. This year, I’m sowing carrots every three weeks until mid June.

Carrot seedlings are up with  radishes.
Carrot seedlings are up with radishes.

 

Case in point, my spinach. I did manage to stagger a bed a few weeks later but I have four varieties in one bed ready now. The upside is I have been able to really compare growth rates and bolt rates between the varieties. Merlo nero grows fastest but stays small while Bloomsdale grows slowly but with large leaves so you get more spinach from your seed.

It's peak season for spinach.
Bloomsdale spinach in front with Merlo nero in the back of the bed.

 

I started a giant bed of beet greens here that I used for micro greens for a few weeks until now when I’ve thinned them enough to grow a pile of beets.

The beets are coming soon.
The beets are coming soon.

 

And while the back garden has been booming, we gutted our front water hogging lawn and replaced it with a drought tolerant patio. We hope to spend more time in the front now interacting with the neighbors. Our street is a main route for tourists on bikes headed to the wineries. And every summer, the Clydesdale horses off the Plaza thunder by on their tour route. We have a primo viewing spot now.

The drough tolerant front yard.
The drough tolerant front yard.

 

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